Authors
Tiffany McDaniel John Samuel Steve Heaney, MC J Sheekey Cook Book Clare Penate Mark Vanhoenacker Caroline Lea Lara Silverstone Christopher Bland James Bannon Ayisha Malik Emily Elgar Lenya Semanis S.E Moorhead Sharbari Ahmed Jason Morgan Elizabeth Fullerton Jeremy Hackett Ed Burstell Kate Sundara Alex Andreou Jem Lester Kathryn Alton Louise Mangos Tony Edwards Janet Todd Jamie Bartlett Natasha Garnett John Bromley-Davenport Lara Silverstone Kate Bevan Laura Tisdall Sarah Vincent Emily Chappell Nikki Owen James Miller Helen Rappaport Gill Wyness Barney Norris Richard Maher Vanessa Manko Adam White Catherine Chanter Jake and Victor Maymudes Jessica Fellowes Edward Young Spela Strukelj Michael Halperin David Varela Jonathan Goodwin Daniel Stevens Eamonn Griffin Gilly Macmillan Gaylene Gould Selina Mills Ruby Wax Celia Imrie Revd Richard Coles Gareth Rubin Maxine Clark Graham Masterton Beryl Kingston Buffalo Pictures (Doc Martin) Dr. Elizabeth Foyster David Francis Xenobe Purvis Iman Verjee Jill Glenn Lisa Eldridge Bryony Gordon J. Kent Messum Cath Bore Poppy Campbell Robert Elms Cecilia Ekbäck Joanne Strasser Matthew Specktor John Gordon Sinclair The Gentle Author Brian Cathcart Paul Conroy Daisy Goodwin Michael Waterhouse Paula Weideger Georgie Thompson Professor Simon Schama Peter Hain Gus Casely-Hayford Aoife Walsh Neal Street Productions Michael Winner Amanda Prowse David Heathcoat-Amory Phil Hardy Maria Anderson Kishwar Desai Jesse Norman MP Tom Wilkinson Sheena Byrom Hanna Jameson Carnival Films (Downton Abbey) Harriet Sergeant Michael Heppell David Blakeley Kriss Russman Peter Sissons Sir Alistair Horne Professor Sir Peter Hall Patricia Leroy Richard Foreman Silvena Rowe Kaushy Patel Wade Davis General Sir John Wilsey Derry Moore Clive Aslet Harry Benson Phil Campion Richard Charlton Mark Dawson Lorraine Gamman Glenn Haybittle John Lahutsky Ebony McKenna Lucy Lord Peter Moore James Palumbo Allison Pearson Mark Pearson Mary Quant K.A.S Quinn Sarah Raven John Rendall Mark Rice-Oxley Geoffrey Robertson Jill Shaw Ruddock Sean Ryan Robert Sackville-West Laura Santtini Samantha Scott-Jeffries Roger Scruton James Shepherd-Barron Silver River Productions William Sitwell Helen Slavin Joan Smith Norman Stone Norman Stone John Sweeney Niall Williams Jeanette Winterson Jonathan Zittrain Sandy Nairne Karl Miller Shireen Jilla Simon Kelner Deborah Mattinson David Linley (Viscount Linley) Twiggy Lawson Lieutenant General Sir Barney White-Spunner Ion Trewin Patrick Tilley Simon King Professor Lord Skidelsky Sir Tim Rice Christine Webber Rt Hon Lord Patten of Barnes Philip Norman Michael Nicholson Nicholas Mosley Russell Miller Professor David McLellan Sunny Jacobs and Peter Pringle Christopher Martin-Jenkins Fiona MacCarthy Tony Lewis Angela Huth Annabel Howard Martin Langfield Harriet Harvey-Wood Professor Henry Kamen Hammer Films Rt Hon Lord Hurd of Westwell Baroness Susan Greenfield Sandra Howard Philip Hook Lynda Gratton Peter Florence Rt Hon Lord Heseltine Rt Hon Lord Healey of Riddlesden David Loyn Mike Dowling Max Hastings Tony Fitzjohn Rt Hon William Hague Damien Lewis Ffion Hague David Gentleman General Sir David Fraser Ilana Fox Karen Dolby Professor M.R.D. Foot David Faber Dr Christopher Duffy Terry Coleman Alex Chance Professor Christopher Bellamy Louise Bagshawe Paddy Ashdown Neal Ascherson Charlie Ellingworth Rowan Walker Mark Diacono Maria Eitel E B Peirse Roland Vernon Maureen Lindley Leander Deeny David Davies Matthew d'Ancona Xanthe Clay Sir Sherard Cowper-Coles Hugh Cornwell Marianne Curley Francis Cottam Liz Jones Jackie Clune Jonathan Franklin Paul Burke Nick Weston Colonel Stuart Tootal Alec Russell Glyn Prysor Pauline Prescott George Obama Brian Moynahan Adrian Fort Lord (Sebastian) Coe Evgenia Citkowitz Caroline Charles Emma Calder Rosie Boycott Pattie Boyd Peter Bowles Kay Burley Richard Attenborough Sarah Winman Marius Brill Alan Philps Bear Grylls Patrick Bishop Jimmy Burns
Journalists
Lisa Eldridge Mark Diacono Louise Mensch Paula Weideger Emma Wilson Lucy Wadham Oliver Rowe Antonia Quirke Jonathan Pett Rebecca Howard Newby Hands David Gritten Sebastian Gibson Tim Atkin Jackie Clune Professor Simon Schama Sandra Howard Stacey Duguid Lorraine Candy Zoe Lewis
Estates
John Creasey Michael Innes Eric Ambler Anthony Masters Josephine Johnson Gabriel Fielding George Bellairs H. M. Tomlinson R.C. Hutchinson Georges Simenon Mazo de la Roche Denis Mackail Lettice Cooper John B. Sanford Dennis Wheatley Jean Saunders Raymond Postgate Alistair Mair Leonard Gribble Nicolas Freeling Edmund Crispin Margery Allingham Jane Aiken Hodge Hammond Innes Hilaire Belloc Alan Clark Colin Clark Ivy Compton-Burnett C. Day Lewis/Nicholas Blake Monica Dickens C. S. Forester E. M. Forster Clement Freud Margaret Irwin Robin Jenkins H. R. F. Keating Arthur Koestler Eric Linklater Gavin Lyall Frank O'Connor Mervyn Peake Evelyn Prentis V. S. Pritchett Bernice Rubens Margery Sharp Edith Sitwell Anthony Storr Catherine Storr Marie Vassiltchikov Rebecca West W. Bridges Adams Kenneth Allsop Martin Armstrong Nora Barlow Clifford Bax Phyllis Bentley Ludwig Bemelmans Marcel Boulestin Ann Bridge
Broadcasters
Mark Hix Annie Gray Martin Dorey Stuart Tootal Janet Reibstein Steve Peters Susie Orbach Susan Greenfield Deana Puccio and Allison Havey Allison Pearson Kay Burley Clive Aslet Tim Hayward Philip Hook Ruby Wax Sandra Howard Jackie Clune Max Hastings Harry Cliff Harriet Sergeant Jessica Fellowes Jeanette Winterson Tim Atkin Paddy Ashdown Gus Casely-Hayford Twiggy Lawson Nick Weston Helen Rappaport William Sitwell John Rendall Phil Campion Mark Diacono Oliver Cox Nev Wilshire Jonathan Goodwin Grant Harrold
Speakers
Ed Burstell Catherine Fisher David Blakeley Sherard Cowper-Coles Jacqueline Yallop Janice Hadlow Mark Hix Annie Gray Martin Dorey Sarah Raven Philip Norman Graham Masterton Philip Hook Daisy Goodwin Jesse Norman Steve Peters Sandra Howard Grant Harrold Janet Reibstein Susie Orbach Susan Greenfield Harry Cliff Deana Puccio and Allison Havey Deeyah Khan Michael Howard Michael Heseltine Paddy Ashdown Stuart Tootal Phil Campion Allison Pearson Kay Burley Clive Aslet Mark Diacono Robert Sackville-West Helen Rappaport Max Hastings Oliver Cox Nick Weston William Sitwell Tim Hayward Francesca Fox Tim Atkin Jonathan Zittrain Nev Wilshire Lynda Gratton Jeanette Winterson Ruby Wax John Rendall Twiggy Lawson Jonathan Goodwin Ilana Fox Jessica Fellowes Jackie Clune Emily Chappell Gus Casely-Hayford

 
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Lettice Cooper

Lettice Cooper (1897–1994), was an English writer. She was born in Eccles, Lancashire on 3 September 1897. She began to write stories when she was seven, and studied Classics at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford graduating in 1918. She returned home after Oxford to work for her family’s engineering firm and wrote her first novel, The Lighted Room in 1925. She spent a year as associate editor at Time and Tide and during the Second World War worked for the Ministry of Food’s public relations division. Between 1947 and 1957 she was fiction reviewer for the Yorkshire Post. She was one of the founders of the Writers’ Action Group along with Brigid Brophy, Maureen Duffy, Francis King and Michael Levy and received an OBE for her work in achieving Public Lending Rights. In 1987 at the age of ninety she was awarded the Freedom of the City of Leeds. She never married and died on 24 July 1994 in Coltishall, Norfolk.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

The New House (1936)
The Lighted Room (1925)
National Provincial (1938)
Fenny (1953)
Biography of Robert Louis Stevenson (1947)
Black Bethlehem (1947)
Blackberry’s Kitten (1960)
Tea on Sunday (1973)
Snow and Roses (1976)
Desirable Residence (1980)
Unusual Behaviour (1986)
Une Journee avec Rhoda (1994)

 

 

 

 

 

 

- Contact -

CAMILLA SHESTOPAL

E-mail: cshestopal@pfd.co.uk

 

Associate Agent: Silvia Molteni

E-mail: smolteni@pfd.co.uk

Telephone number: 02073441000


 
 
Publications
Lettice Cooper
 

THE NEW HOUSE

 

The New House was given by Lettice Cooper to her nephew’s wife – Jilly Cooper, who writes in her new Persephone Preface: ‘More than forty years later, I still remember how enraptured I was by The New House, staying up all night to finish it.’ Jilly Cooper continues: ‘For, like Charles Dickens and Robert Louis Stevenson, whose biographies Lettice later wrote, she was above all a storyteller, not of action-packed sagas, but of adventures of the heart. All that outwardly happens in The New House is over one long day a family move from a large imposing secluded house with beautiful gardens to a small one overlooking a housing estate. But all the characters and their relationships with each other are so lovingly portrayed that one cares passionately what happens even to the unpleasant ones.
The New House reminds me of my favourite author Chekhov, who so influenced Lettice’s generation of writers. Like him, she had perfect social pitch and could draw an arriviste developer as convincingly as a steely Southern social butterfly. Like him she seldom judged her characters and found humour and pathos in every situation. Part of her genius as a writer is to realise that humans are never consistent, that “hard people will suddenly be tender and gentle people hurt you.” Every time the reader becomes outraged at the monstrous egotism of a character, the kaleidoscope shifts and they do something spontaneously, unexpectedly kind. “I never meant to be a selfish woman,” cries Natalie in a rare and touching moment of self-knowledge, but an adoring husband had made it so easy. “I wish he’d shaken me and told me not to be a little fool.”
Like Chekhov, Lettice is also wonderful on lost love. Both the heroine Rhoda and her maiden Aunt Ellen turn down men whom they love and who love them because they put duty first and are not prepared to abandon their dominating mothers. But before either of them can adjust their haloes, Lettice (or Rhoda) points out: “You lived to be good not happy… It was better to forego your own wishes and enjoy the rarefied happiness from being on the side of the angels.”
Jealousy is also brilliantly depicted. Thus we see Rhoda frantic to escape her mother’s clutches yet unable to hide her resentment that maiden Aunt Ellen, during the move, is suddenly better at calming and looking after Natalie than Rhoda is. While Natalie, having totally enslaved Rhoda, is unable to hide her jealousy that an old school friend, who writes to wish Rhoda luck on the morning of the move, may be loved by Rhoda more than herself.
The New House does not date, and reads as freshly today because above all it is about the shifting balance of power within any family. In our twenty-first century, the grand old house would probably be saved as a listed building and the NIMBYs would be out protesting against anything being built in its place. Unlike them, but like Rhoda, Lettice was a true socialist, who although sad to leave a large, beautiful home, felt her conscience eased because it seemed right that such places should be knocked down to make way for lots of little houses for the poor. ’

 

Published: PERSEPHONE BOOKS, 22nd March 2004

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Lettice Cooper
 

NATIONAL PROVINCIAL

 

When she steps off the London train at Leeds (known in the novel as Aire) Mary Welburn is returning to the world of her childhood. But while she attempts to settle back into her family, Mary strikes up new relationships and learns how the North, in 1938, is reacting to a confused and threatening world.

 

Published: BLOOMSBURY READER, 7th November 2012

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Lettice Cooper
 

SNOW & ROSES

 

Flora is a young Oxford lecturer, whose love affair with a married man has ended in tragedy. She faces a bleak, empty world. Following an ill-fated flight to a villa in Tuscany, and the collapse of her warm friendship with Lalage, an Oxford colleague, Flora is close to breakdown. She is rescued by her understanding family and by her return to Oxford, where she finds release from her own emotional problems in those of her most brilliant student, Nan, who seems about to sacrifice her career on the alter of revolutionary politics. Lettice Cooper explores and illuminates the varied contrasts of generations, classes and beliefs, and is equally absorbing in the smaller world of university rivalries and gossip, or the hot-house jealousies and intrigues in an Italian villa. Above all, this book illuminates the personality of a young woman at a crisis in her life.

 

Published: BLOOMSBURY READER, 7th November 2012

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Lettice Cooper
 

GUNPOWDER, TREASON AND PLOT

 

On the fifth of November every year, children all over England delightedly light bonfires, swish sparklers and gobble toffee apples in celebration of Bonfire Night, and the death of Guy Fawkes.But what reallyhappened on the night of the Fifth of November, 1605, when the plot to blow up King and Parliament was discovered? And what led up to so extreme a course of action? It is a story of intrigue, unsurpassed even in a century when intrigues were commonplace, and of religious zeal reaching fanatical proportions. Lettice Cooper has told the true story of this whole fantastic episode – an episode which has captured and held the imagination of English people for hundreds of years. She has added nothing but her brilliant writing. The story was there – in abundance.

 

Published: BLOOMSBURY READER, 2nd November 2012

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Lettice Cooper
 

BLACK BETHLEHEM

 

Three long short stories, two of which are backgrounded by the war and the now familiar bombing of London, and introduce a great deal of war motivated episode and debate.

The first concerns wounded, discharged and returning war hero, Alan Marriot, who can find no political certainty, no personal stability; the second, Lucy Meadows, who takes in a refugee woman who is always to remain an alien, who rewards her generosity by seducing Lucy’s longstanding lover; and the third tells of a small boy’s tension and hatred after the arrival of a new baby.

 

Published: PFD Books, 2nd May 2013

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